A beginner bassist's foray into the unknown

The Amazing Human Musical Mind, Part 10

I meant to reblog this a while ago, but got caught up in other things. Here’s the last segment of Mr. A‘s series, The Amazing Human Musical Mind, in which he discusses the developmental impact of music on children’s brains. In his concluding piece, he speaks about singing to children as part of conversation or when giving directions, as well as incorporating call-and-response so that they sing back when communicating with you.

Apparently, children often sing in two pitches, which he identifies as mi and so, or the 3rd and 5th of a given scale, which are chord tones. I never realized that, so now I need to look for it with our toddler.

Anyway, singing like this allows children to explore pitch and rhythm – which means they’re also learning about space and time, including following patterns and predicting the next note when answering (or even when listening along). Reading poetry aloud accomplishes the same thing – which is interesting, because I read a lot of nursery rhymes and other rhyming stories to our toddler, and she does seem to pick up on the rhythm when I get it right. She chants stuff back to me during the day a lot – in particular, nursery rhymes.

Here are the other parts of the series:

mr a music place

2011Symposium_1_2Today I conclude my series on early childhood music, and the amazing things even the youngest minds can do musically.

Another way you can work singing into your normal routine is to converse with children by singing. All it takes is two or three pitches, and you can easily say or ask children anything while you sing. For example, you could sing Boys and girls; it’s circle time going back and forth between two pitches.You could also sing directions, such as, Sit in a circle and then I’ll read you a poem. Or, you can use call and response. Ask your children what day of the week it is, and then they sing back the answer.  Boys and girls, what day is it?Mr. Adams, it is Friday. All this on just two pitches, like the two you hear children naturally chant when they are playing. Musicians recognize…

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One response

  1. Pingback: The Amazing Human Musical Mind (by Mr. A) | Ugly Bass Face

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